DVT

Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) feels like a tight muscle and is tender to press.

In some cases, there may be no symptoms of DVT. If symptoms do occur they can include:

  • pain, swelling and tenderness in one of your legs (usually your calf)
  • a heavy ache in the affected area
  • warm skin in the area of the clot
  • red skin, particularly at the back of your leg below the knee
  • DVT usually (although not always) affects one leg
  • The pain may be worse when you bend your foot upward towards your knee

If you have any of these symptoms please immediately see your GP or attend Accident and Emergency at your nearest hospital.

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a blood clot that develops within a deep vein in the body, usually in the leg.

Blood clots that develop in a vein are also known as venous thrombosis.

DVT usually occurs in a deep leg vein, a larger vein that runs through the muscles of the calf and the thigh.

It can cause pain and swelling in the leg and may lead to complications such as pulmonary embolism. This is a serious condition that occurs when a piece of blood clot breaks off into the bloodstream and blocks one of the blood vessels in the lungs (see below).

DVT and pulmonary embolism together are known as venous thromboembolism (VTE).